melasma

Removing the Mask

Melasma treatments continue to proliferate but long-lasting results remain out of reach.
MedEsthetics Jan/Feb 2018 Removing the Mask

Dermatologists see it regularly—symmetrical patches of excess pigmentation across the nose and/or on the cheeks, chin and forehead. Sometimes called the “mask of pregnancy,” melasma is more common among women but is also seen in men. Causes include a complex amalgam of genetic and hormonal influences that are not yet fully understood, and treatment is challenging.

“Melasma can be categorized according to clinical patterns and histopathology, or depth of pigment in the skin,” says dermatologist Marta I. Rendon, MD, Rendon Center, Boca Raton, Florida.

Hyperpigmentation Linked to Vascularity

Hyperpigmentation Linked to Vascularity

A study published in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology (December 2015) addressed the link between pigmentation and vascularization in melasma and hyperpigmentation. Using high-magnification digital epiluminescence dermatoscopy, laser confocal microscopy and histological examination, Claire Regazzetti, et al, demonstrated that benign vascular lesions have restricted but significant hyperpigmentation compared with the surrounding skin.

Botanicals Effective in Preventing and Reducing Epidermal Hyperpigmentation

Botanicals Effective in Preventing and Reducing Epidermal Hyperpigmentation

According to recent review study published online in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology (November 25, 2013), several botanical ingredients have shown effectiveness in the treatment of epidermal-confined hyperpigmentation, and consistently improved epidermal melasma, subclinical photoaging and acute pigmentation induced by UV exposure.