Patient Care

Saying "No"

In aesthetic medicine, the customer—or patient—is not always right, and practitioners need to be prepared to deny unreasonable requests.
MedEsthetics September 2019

Cosmetic procedures are elective. Patients come in with expectations, not medical concerns, which can make some situations challenging. Aesthetic practitioners often need to guide patients away from procedures not in their best interests. When safety is an issue, physicians readily say “no,” and patients are usually grateful. Conflicts can arise, however, when patients present with preconceived notions of how best to achieve a certain look.

When the Mirror Lies

How to recognize and respond to patients with body dysmorphic disorder.
MedEsthetics Jan/Feb When the Mirror Lies

Every cosmetic provider has repeat patients. But not all of those “regulars” are satisfied customers hoping to wind back the clock a few years or improve upon Mother Nature. Some people who seek multiple cosmetic procedures have a widespread, but under-diagnosed, mental-health condition known as body dysmorphic disorder (BDD). People with BDD have a distorted perception of their appearance, leading to an obsessive preoccupation with minimal or imagined flaws.

Consultation Support

Tools and strategies that help improve consultations and conversion rates.
Image: a doctor touching his patient's face

Much has been written about how to attract prospective patients to one’s aesthetic practice, but bringing consumers in the door is only the beginning. Once a consultation has been booked, medspas and cosmetic practices must be able to identify a prospective patient’s specific concerns and aesthetic goals, and be prepared to effectively communicate both recommended treatment options and why their team is qualified to help the patient achieve these goals.

The Art of Selling

Selling your services and providing the best patient care can go hand in hand.
The Art of Selling

When you became a medical provider, you likely did not envision yourself acting as a salesperson. But owners and managers of medical aesthetic practices must become comfortable with selling themselves, their providers and their products if they want to keep their doors open.

The good news is sales and patient care are not in-congruous. Every time you educate a patient about the services and products you offer, you are not only helping them achieve their aesthetic goals, you are also selling.

Children Are Welcome

Offering childcare services in a medical aesthetics facility.
Children Are Welcome

As an industry that serves a disproportionate number of women, it is no surprise that patients often ask providers if they can bring their children with them to their appointments.

Informed Consent

The informed consent process involves more than just sharing risks.
Informed Consent

Informed consent is the process by which a treating healthcare provider discloses appropriate information to a patient in order for the patient to make a voluntary choice whether to accept or refuse the proposed treatment. It originates from the legal and ethical rights of the patient to direct what happens to his or her body as well as from the ethical duty of the physician to involve the patient in the healthcare decision-making process.

Informed Consent

The informed consent process involves more than just sharing risks.
Informed Consent

Informed consent is the process by which a treating healthcare provider discloses appropriate information to a patient in order for the patient to make a voluntary choice whether to accept or refuse the proposed treatment. It originates from the legal and ethical rights of the patient to direct what happens to his or her body as well as from the ethical duty of the physician to involve the patient in the healthcare decision-making process.

More Empathy = Better Outcomes

Patient with Doctor

Higher empathy levels among physicians are tied to a reduction in complications among patients, according to researchers at Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia. Stefano Del Canale, MD, PhD, et al, published the results of a retrospective correlational study that included 20,961 patients with Type I or Type 2 diabetes mellitus and 242 treating primary care physicians.