Equipment

Multimodal Resurfacing

Combining aggressive laser resurfacing treatments can offer added benefits for select patients.
Multimodal Resurfacing

Combination procedures have become commonplace in medical aesthetic practices, typically involving treatments such as neurotoxins, dermal fillers and IPL or other energy-based devices. But do patients benefit from a combination of more aggressive laser treatments—and is it safe? This is the question Richard Fitzpatrick, MD, sought to answer in one of his last research projects. He and his colleague Douglas C.

Redefining Microdermabrasion

Micro-resurfacing may be a better term for the wide variety of noninvasive physical exfoliation treatments now available.
Redefining  Microdermabrasion

Developed in Italy in 1985, the first microdermabrasion machine blasted the epidermis with aluminum oxide crystals to remove the outermost layer of dead cells and then vacuumed away the debris to reveal fresh, glowing skin. While the results are much the same today, the process now involves a dizzying array of micro-exfoliation choices. In addition to aluminum oxide, microdermabrasion machines now spray sodium chloride, sodium bicarbonate and magnesium oxide. Some devices don’t use crystals at all.

Ultrasound Guidance More Accurate Than Clinical Markings in Masseter Injections

Ultrasound Guidance More Accurate Than Clinical Markings in Masseter Injections

Individual anatomical variations can make it difficult to safely and effectively treat bruxism with neuromodulators, leading researchers Natacha Quezada-Gaon, MD, et al, of Pontifical Catholic University’s Department of Dermatology in Santiago, Chile, to investigate the use of ultrasound-guided injections. Thirty patients with bruxism were treated with botulinum toxin injections in each masseter muscle. The authors used ultrasound imaging and clinical markings—which were later compared—to guide their injections in 20 patients and clinical markings only in 10 cases.